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QipaoLove: Part 29 ~ Swinging the 60's ethnic style into modern day 2016!

Welcome to my entry for Oxfam Online Shop's vintage face and style competition, for the 1960's decade! The face of vintage is usually not one of Asia as many tend to forget that vintage style existed there too, and my chosen favourite Chinese dress the Qipao (or Cheongsam) is often a daily wardrobe choice of ladies living in Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, some sporadic parts of Asia and the West for those with a Chinese ethnic background or as a fashionable formal event dress in the 60s. Many have described the 1960s as a point where the world entered into a modernity of popular culture, and many places in South East Asia were no different. With the rush of skilled Qipao tailors fleeing to Hong Kong, Taiwan, Malaysia and Singapore in the 1950s, and fashionable ladies looking to modern Western culture on the big screen, a spinning fusion began to emerge. By the 1960s, long length Qipao dresses were being take up to above knee level, the figure hugging hour glass fit mostly remained and experimentation with more colourful or textured fabrics became common. If selected, I hope my choice of simple cross-cultural vintage 60s style will show younger generations how easy it is to wear the Cheongsam in modern life and encourage others of an ethnic background to explore more vintage!
#VintageFaceandStyle









Until the next time,
May xx



Comments

  1. Dear perfect look!!! And i love this wonderful bag.... its amazing!!!! Where do you buy this sweet purse please? Thanks and kissssssssssss from Spain!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello dear, thank you for the lovely comment! This 1960s pink raffia purse is an ebay purchase...a bit of a lucky find some time ago unfortunately, so not sure where the might still have it. xx

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  2. Hi,

    I've been browsing your site since earlier this year when I was looking for places in the UK I could buy a cheong sam from. I've now got a different question - I've accidentally torn a Chinese knot button off my dress and I was wondering if the knot could be sewn back on. My Google attempts haven't turned up anything useful, and I thought you might know? If so, are there any seamstresses in London you might recommend?

    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Dominique,
      Yes the knot buttons can be sewn back on, as it is usually sewn on by hand and made by hand. You can easily do this by hand sewing it. Also depends if the knotted button itself is damaged or still in good condition?
      If you would like to find a tailor to sew the knotted button on to the Qipao by hand I can recommend Michaela in North London, who has made garments for me before:
      Michaela's
      344 Cricklewood lane, London NW2 2QH
      EMAIL: VALMIDESIGN[at]YAHOO[dot]CO[dot]UK
      She might be able to help and has good quality work. Hope that helps!
      May

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~Thank you so so much! I love hearing from you and appreciate every beautiful comment. Please feel free to follow and walk with me too.....have a fabulously lovely day my darlings!
Until the next time,
♥ May xx

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